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… Vuitton that is.  I’ve never spent more than $50 on a handbag so I am not in the LVMH (Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessy–a French luxury goods conglomerate) league.  However I know people who know not just “expensive” but <<luxe, … et volupté>> as in luxury, … and voluptuousness. (Matisse reference blog coming soon.)

LV Cyan Luxe

LV Cyan Luxe

My dearest friend has Louis Vuitton acquisition desires.  We looked at handbag models during a recent trip to San Francisco.  Ma chère amie looked longingly at what was a truly beautiful example of a luxury handbag.  I am happy to report that both of us were <<calme>> when the sales-mannequin quoted the price.

I understand that some LV handbag owners justify the up front cost of these exquisitely made goods as an investment rather than an expense and that there’s an active secondary market for Vuitton as well as other makers of these “accessories”.

Just today a savvy young woman told me about her recent Paris shopping trip to a Louis Vuitton Boutique.  She economized on her hotel and meals, saving her financial resources for an investment in a handbag.  She told me that she saved vast sums of money by purchasing the handbag in France for a lower price than at a local California boutique, waiting for a good currency exchange rate and getting her VAT back.  All of these financial considerations start to sound like buying petroleum debentures to me.  Then again, an investor might do very well financially and get to carry a beautiful LV Epi-Neverfull Cyan handbag in the bargain.

"Neverfull" model

“Neverfull” model

I’m attempting to entice my dear friend to join me for an LV Paris shopping excursion. There are several LV Boutiques not far from my studio.  The closest boutique turns out to be in the 6th arrondissement, and right across from L’église Saint-Germain-des-Prés!  I’m thinking lunch at Deux Magots or Brassiere Lipp, a <<shopping>> at the LV and then a stroll along Rue de Buci showing off either the Cyan or perhaps Fuchsia model.

**This blog title was prompted by Sondheim’s musical about George Seurat.  The character of Dot sings “Everybody Love Louis” (the baker who sells what he makes rather than George who makes things that nobody buys).