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I’ve been preparing for an upcoming **Research Visit** (and therefore a business expense “:-)” to the restaurant Le Grand Colbert.  I noticed that on their website they announce that they are a WIFI ZONE.  I first heard a native French speaker say “wi-fi” in 2006.  I had to stifle a laugh.  To my American/English ears it sounds like “wee-fee”.  That recollection started my “fun with Franglish” associations tumbling out.  The results follow…

Le Grand Colbert website also announces that they provide a “Voiturier” service – a person who will park your car.  In my earliest French classes, I learned that <<voiture>> was equivalent to “car” or “automobile”.  A person who parks cars around here (California) is often referred to as a “Valet” pronounced in the French (not British) fashion (thank God).

Day and Night

Day and Night

I also learned during my earliest French classes that the French word for “parking” was <<stationner>> (well ok, not “parking” but “to park”). Nowadays I frequently hear native French speakers use the work “parking” instead of their own word.  However the street signs that indicate “No Parking” make good use of <<stationner> as in <<Defense de Stationner>>, <<Interdiction de Stationner>> and my personal favorite <<Stationnement Interdit>>.  <<Interdit>> is a good French word for American tourists to recognize.

Forbidden!

Forbidden!

Driving, let alone parking a car in Paris is not for the faint of heart.  I swore off ever trying to rent a car and drive anywhere near Paris sometime in the previous century.  I will council anyone I care about against attempting to drive a car in and around Paris.  Dear Readers, please use **any** other transportation method — the preferred being the bus simply because Buses are Better!.  When you use the fabulous Paris bus system you never need to worry about “le parking” <<interdit>> or not.