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The difference in the two words in this blog title is the space between La and chaise.  With the space included, the two words can be translated as “the chair”*.  Without the space, the single word is probably a reference to Père Lachaise, the Parisian cemetery located in the 11th arrondissement that is “inhabited” by many famous formerly living celebrities.

Jim Morrison gravesite at Père Lachaise

Jim Morrison gravesite at Père Lachaise

Edith Piaf gravesite at Père Lachaise

Edith Piaf gravesite at Père Lachaise

It never occurred to me to include a visit to Père Lachaise in my list of sights every visitor simply **must see** on their first few visits.  I’ve now had two blog visitors ask me about getting to Père Lachaise.  As I mentioned in a previous post, Jim Morrison’s gravesite is a popular American pilgrimage destination for those of us who grew up (sort of) in the 60s.  My personal preference in musicians/singers is Edith Piaf who is also installed at Père Lachaise.

Bus line #69 is one of the “Best Tourist Bus Lines” in Paris and will get you to Père Lachaise cemetery after a lovely ride next to the Seine river much of the time.  Looking closely at the #69 RATP map I noticed several <<arrêt non accessible>> stops.  I want to remind everyone that while **all** buses are wheelchair accessible, some bus stops are not.  I’d be glad to help you figure out the nearest UFR accessible stop on line 69 or any bus line while you’re in Paris.  Please contact me.

St/roll across a bridge or two.

St/roll across a bridge or two.

I will personally be heading out to Père Lachaise when I’m back in Paris this summer.   I’ll need to walk from my studio across La Seine (Left Bank to Right Bank) in order to catch the #69 bus at the (UFR accessible) Hôtel de Ville stop.  My RATP recommended walking route indicates that it will take about 6 minutes, but they have a weird route with an unnecessary back and forth thing.  I’m pretty sure I can simply cross La Seine directly at Pont Notre-Dame instead of using Pont d’Aricole.  Then again, looking at the Google map I might change my mind and my walking route depending on the traffic, time of day, weather, and my mood.

Crossing at the Pont au Double will put me directly in front of Notre-Dame Cathedral and I remember that “The Bird Man” does a charming show for tourists in the garden on the corner.  No matter which bridges I cross, it will take me just a few minutes to walk to my bus stop.  And I will undoubtedly be feeling glad to be alive before I take the bus to the cemetery.

*(My UFR post deals with some more words about chairs.)